Mac Vs Windows

TLChris

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After leaving the world of computer repair as a Geek Squad Agent working in-home and on-site for enterprise...I went all in on mac.

Luckily, I've used macs since make that switch. Personally to save a few bucks I'll buy a refurbished or even used apple. The mac mini that I use as a home server came from Craigslist, and I souped it up with maxing the ram and installing an SSD. If you don't need cutting edge technology, and can handle basic repair, I'd go the refurbished route.
 

BigPete7978

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I think both have their positives and negatives. I have had both Macs and Windows machines, and like both of them for various reasons. It all comes down to what you are trying to do.
 

Ingenious

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This thread has been resurrected from the dead! ;)

My very old (>10 years) Macbook Pro died recently. I'd held off upgrading to another MacBook as the prices went silly, the ports disappeared on newer models, the keyboard went faulty apparently and it become non user repairable. My MacBook Pro has had a new SSD, new RAM, multiple new batteries, a new motherboard connector from Hong Kong. Try doing that on a modern Mac!

Unfortunately I couldn't find a windows laptop that felt so nice to use, so a few weeks ago bit the bullet and got the base 2020 MacBook Air. It's so nice, I am really pleased with it. The new keyboard is excellent, the speed surprising (so quick compared to my old Pro but bear in mind how old it was) and I am learning to live with dongles and adapters. Shame I won't be able to fix it or replace the battery myself but it is a lovely machine.

Ignore all the YouTube videos telling you to get the i5 model (influencers mainly, paid to promote products), the base i3 is fine for most stuff. Though it probably wouldn't do 4k editing well (you'd get a MacBook Pro for that, or a well specced PC desktop).
 

Taylor J

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I actually just got my first Mac product around 2 weeks ago (purchased it from B&H).

I got the newest Macbook Pro with a few of the options specced out (more ram and the better GPU). I wanted something to be able to continue on my path of learning to program but to be able to do it from anywhere rather than sit on my gaming rig all day and also get tempted to play games rather than learn to program and I also wanted something that wasn't Windows and to try something new (I have also wanted a Mac since I was 12).

So far it's been amazing. I love the keyboard and it's amazing to type on. It has taken some time to adjust to though and I'm either mis typing a lot or having to hit backspace a lot (I haven't used a membrane keyboard in many many years and have been only using mechanical keyboards).
 

Ingenious

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It has taken some time to adjust to though and I'm either mis typing a lot or having to hit backspace a lot
Yes, it's very easy to hit 4 keys at once on these, I'm having to look at the keyboard a lot rather than the screen to keep coordinated!
 

Chemical

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I've been using and building PCs since 1985 and using high end Macs since 2010. Most software runs fine on both and that includes the Adobe CC suite. But beware, MAC GPU support is not widespread in some areas, notably with some 3D renderers such as Redshift. But that's a pretty specialist area. Generally the build quality and screens on both MacBooks and iMacs are fab. More expensive for sure. Screen and build quality apart, you generally get a better bang for your bucks with PCs.

As an aside, we are still using MacBooks from 2010. Not sure I could say that I was still using any PC derivative 10 years after I bought it.
 

Ryan Ashbrook

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As an aside, we are still using MacBooks from 2010. Not sure I could say that I was still using any PC derivative 10 years after I bought it.
My MacBook Pro is nearing ten years old as well, and I still use it. Not really for work purposes anymore, though - I use my iMac for that.

If I replace it anytime soon, it'll be because I just want something newer, rather than out of necessity.

When I used PC's, they generally had a lifespan of five to seven years but that was mostly because I constantly tinkered with them, which probably resulted in me breaking them down faster than they would normally.
 

overcast

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I've been using and building PCs since 1985 and using high end Macs since 2010.
I wish I had money that time. I kind of changed like 5 machines so far since 2005. I think macs are indeed long lasting than that.
 

mysiteguy

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There's no reason why a PC wouldn't last as long unless you buy the cheapest machine barely able to work with the current version of Windows. I have a couple of 15+ year-old machines here working just fine with Windows 10, including a laptop - and several 5 to 10 year-old-systems still actively used.

My primary system upgrades have not been because the current one couldn't do the job. Its always been to take advantage of faster CPUs, higher maximum RAM and faster I/O buses to do the work quicker. Microsoft has a pretty good track record of supporting 1-2+ older hardware generations when the OS has a major upgrade. A 10-year-old Mac is no different, it can continue to work but a newer Mac is going to do CPU/RAM intensive work quicker.
 
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zappaDPJ

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There's no reason why a PC wouldn't last as long unless you buy the cheapest machine barely able to work with the current version of Windows. I have a couple of 15+ year-old machines here working just fine with Windows 10, including a laptop - and several 5 to 10 year-old-systems still actively used.
Reading that reminded me the first PC I bought cost more and did less than any other computer I've bought since. It came with 1 MB of RAM, a 1.2 MB floppy drive and a 40 MB hard drive. Add an EGA card, colour monitor and a maths co-processor (I think) which I did, the total price for a Compaq Deskpro 386 was approx. $8,000 or $18,000 in today's money. Although it was the fastest PC money could buy I replaced it very quickly :facepalm:

Since then I've built my own PCs from parts and I agree, 10 to 15 years with the occasional upgrade is easily achievable.
 

Chemical

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A 10-year-old Mac is no different, it can continue to work but a newer Mac is going to do CPU/RAM intensive work quicker.
Quicker doesn't make it better unless your day depends on it. It just so happens that I work in an industry that needs as much horsepower as it can get, but that's not the case for most. Besides that, not many PCs or Macs are built like they used to be. A MacBook from 2010 is built to a much higher standard than its 2020 equivalent, offering a much nicer experience, even if a bit slower.
 

Chemical

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Reading that reminded me the first PC I bought cost more and did less than any other computer I've bought since. It came with 1 MB of RAM, a 1.2 MB floppy drive and a 40 MB hard drive. Add an EGA card, colour monitor and a maths co-processor (I think) which I did, the total price for a Compaq Deskpro 386 was approx. $8,000 or $18,000 in today's money. Although it was the fastest PC money could buy I replaced it very quickly :facepalm:

Since then I've built my own PCs from parts and I agree, 10 to 15 years with the occasional upgrade is easily achievable.
I was a product manager at Autodesk in the 90s and for rendering, 386 Compaqs with Weitek copros were the order of the day. Luckily they were provided FOC by Compaq :)
 

Ryan Ashbrook

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There's no reason why a PC wouldn't last as long unless you buy the cheapest machine barely able to work with the current version of Windows. I have a couple of 15+ year-old machines here working just fine with Windows 10, including a laptop - and several 5 to 10 year-old-systems still actively used.
To be clear, any reason a computer I had that didn't last longer than five years was purely my fault lol.
 

mysiteguy

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To be clear, any reason a computer I had that didn't last longer than five years was purely my fault lol.
Worst for me was trying to glue a hinge on a laptop that was still under warranty because I didn't want to be without it for a week. It was the first time I used the particular kind of glue and I didn't know it expands (greatly) as it dries! $1800 laptop trashed by that bad decision.
 
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overcast

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My PC machines are kind of beginner level Lenovo right now. In past I had Dell machine and prior to that HP machine. But I guess the current low performance is due to low RAM, I have 4GB that goes slow. I can do better with linux with this RAM but windows not so much.
 
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