Internet Explorer has been retired

Thoughts on Edge?

  • Adequate for daily use

    Votes: 7 50.0%
  • Experienced annoying issues

    Votes: 4 28.6%
  • Whatever I just hate micro$oft

    Votes: 3 21.4%

  • Total voters
    14

LeadCrow

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Internet Explorer 11 has retired and is officially out of support—what you need to know
By Clippy, 15 june 2022

After 25+ years of helping people use and experience the web, Internet Explorer (IE) is officially retired and out of support as of today, June 15, 2022. To many millions of you, thank you for using Internet Explorer as your gateway to the internet.

As a user, my first experience with IE was version 3, and my view of what was possible on the internet was transformed by the introduction of Dynamic HTML in IE4 and the introduction of AJAX in IE6. When I got the opportunity to join the IE7 team, I leapt on it, and have been a part of the Microsoft browser journey in some form ever since. Internet Explorer’s reputation today is, deservedly, one of a product from an older era—quirky in behavior and lacking the security of a modern browser. But its contributions to the evolution of the web have been remarkable, from helping to make the web truly interactive with DHTML and AJAX to hardware-accelerated graphics to innovations in touch/pen browsing. Working on the retirement of Internet Explorer has been a constant reminder of its importance; every day we work with customers who have built their businesses on Internet Explorer. To work on a product with such broad impact has been nothing but humbling—our story in many ways is the story of the internet and what it has allowed people and organizations around the world to do.

But the web has evolved and so have browsers. Incremental improvements to Internet Explorer couldn’t match the general improvements to the web at large, so we started fresh. Microsoft Edge is a faster, more secure and modern browser—the best browser for Windows—designed for today’s internet. But we haven’t forgotten that some parts of the web still rely on Internet Explorer’s specific behaviors and features, which is why Microsoft Edge comes with Internet Explorer mode (IE mode). Regardless of the site or standard—old or new—you can access what you need in Microsoft Edge with new modern features to make your time online even better.


So, what happens now for everyday users?​


Example IE to Edge redirection message


Example message informing users they are being redirected to Microsoft Edge


Over the next few months, opening Internet Explorer will progressively redirect users to our new modern browser, Microsoft Edge with IE mode. Users will still see the Internet Explorer icon on their devices (such as on the taskbar or in the Start menu) but if they click to open Internet Explorer, Microsoft Edge will open instead with easy access to IE mode. Eventually, Internet Explorer will be disabled permanently as part of a future Windows Update, at which point the Internet Explorer icons on users’ devices will be removed.

As part of this redirection process, users will have their data like favorites, passwords and settings imported from Internet Explorer—this will help make the transition to Microsoft Edge both familiar and simple. If a user wants to delete or manage their data at any point after, they can always do so in Microsoft Edge from the Settings menu.

Some websites only work with Internet Explorer—these websites might be built on older internet technology and not function properly while using a modern browser. Understanding this, we’ve built Microsoft Edge with IE mode.

To help users get started with IE mode, the redirection process will add a “Reload in IE mode” button (see below) to their toolbar in Microsoft Edge. That way, if they encounter a website that may not work correctly—or if they visit a website that asks them to open the site using Internet Explorer—they can easily click the button to open the page in IE mode. Microsoft Edge will even ask them if they’d like the page to open in IE mode next time automatically! Microsoft Edge will check in with the user every 30 days to make sure they still need IE mode for the site. As more and more sites get updated to modern standards, users will need to use IE mode less and the modern rendering engine more.


Businesses can automate IE mode for their users​

If you’re an IT professional and your organization uses older, legacy sites as part of your normal business processes, you can easily automate IE mode so that those pages launch in IE mode automatically for your users.

Today’s retirement covers all currently supported versions of Windows 10 Home, Pro, Enterprise, Edu and IoT (Internet Explorer is already removed from Windows 11). Internet Explorer will not be immediately removed on all these versions today but will be progressively redirected to Microsoft Edge on all these devices over the next few months (just like for everyday users) to give our customers time to find any sites they potentially missed and complete their transition. After this redirection phase, Internet Explorer will be permanently disabled on devices via a future Windows Update.

For certain versions of Windows currently in-support and used in critical environments, we will continue to support Internet Explorer on those versions until they go out of support. These include all currently in-support Windows 10 LTSC releases (including IoT) and all Windows Server versions, as well as Windows 10 China Government Edition, Windows 8.1, and Windows 7 with Extended Security Updates (ESUs). Future versions of these editions will not include Internet Explorer. Developers who rely on the underlying MSHTML (Trident) platform and COM controls on Windows will also continue to be supported on all Windows platforms.

And of course, we have committed to supporting IE mode in Microsoft Edge through at least 2029.

As a business, you can set up IE mode to use a site list, where you can catalog those sites that require Internet Explorer and have them load automatically in IE mode. You can store this site list locally, or in the cloud through the Microsoft 365 admin center, and any site on the list will load for your users in IE mode. This is the recommended approach if you’re a business that manages your devices and has legacy requirements.

We have help along the way if you experience compatibility issues when testing your websites in IE mode. You can get no-cost remediation assistance for those issues from our App Assure compatibility experts by submitting a request for assistance or by emailing us at ACHELP@microsoft.com.

Once you’ve finished setting up IE mode and testing your sites, you can use the DisableIE policy as the final step to redirect your users from IE to Microsoft Edge so they can start using IE mode.

Learn how to set up IE mode here or explore the FAQ.

The easiest thing to do is to start using Microsoft Edge today​

Instead of waiting to be redirected to Microsoft Edge, the easiest thing to do is to get started with Microsoft Edge today. If you’re using Windows, you can open Microsoft Edge from the Windows Start menu or by clicking the Microsoft Edge icon if you see it on your desktop or taskbar.

Microsoft Edge icon on the Windows 11 taskbar and in the Start menu

Microsoft Edge icon on the Windows 11 taskbar and in the Start menu

If it’s your first-time using Microsoft Edge, you’ll be guided through a quick set up process that includes importing your data—complete this, and you’re set. If you’ve opened Microsoft Edge before and need to import your data from Internet Explorer, follow the steps in the video provided in the section above.

The best part? Once you’re set up in Microsoft Edge, you’ll be ready to use it when you upgrade to Windows 11. While Internet Explorer is not available on Windows 11, Microsoft Edge is the best browser for Windows, and it includes IE mode, so all you’ll need to do is sign into Microsoft Edge and get to browsing!

Microsoft Edge is also available on other platforms, including macOS, iOS, Android and Linux. Download here.

The future of Internet Explorer is in Microsoft Edge​

If you have ever used IE to explore the internet, we want to share our deepest thanks for being a part of this journey with us. You’ve used it to build apps to support your businesses and to connect with people around the world; in doing so, you have been instrumental in how the web has progressed. While we bid farewell to Internet Explorer, Microsoft Edge stands ready to be your new everyday browser for work, life and everything in between. With IE mode, Microsoft Edge offers unmatched compatibility for the internet, whether the website was built 10 years or 10 days ago. The future of Internet Explorer is in Microsoft Edge, giving you a faster, more secure and more modern browser.

Browse on, internet explorers.
 

Oldsmoboi

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Mar 24, 2009
Messages
734
Edge is fine... it's just Chrome with Microsoft snooping instead of Google snooping.

That said, it would be darn nifty if MS would release an update for their servers so that IE is not the default browser for certain system-level and management tool things.
 

Tracy Perry

Opinionated asshat
Joined
May 25, 2013
Messages
5,098
Edge is fine... i
not.... I've found one security camera application that was dependent on IE that refuses to work with Edge. Yes, it's an older device, but has been working fine since it was bought, still works as far as recording and it's rather hard to justify a few thousand outlay for a new device when the current one still meets the needs.
 

Penguin

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Messages
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not.... I've found one security camera application that was dependent on IE that refuses to work with Edge. Yes, it's an older device, but has been working fine since it was bought, still works as far as recording and it's rather hard to justify a few thousand outlay for a new device when the current one still meets the needs.

Hi Tracy, have you tried using IE mode with Edge? That may help resolve the issue https://uk.pcmag.com/migrated-3765-...o-enable-internet-explorer-mode-in-windows-11
 

Taylor J

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I don't really see how a device being dependent on an outdated browser makes a different browser not fine.
 

Pete

Flavours of Forums Forever
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Sep 9, 2013
Messages
2,705
Oh, man, Freeserve. Memories right there.

I remember teaching myself HTML with IE3 back in the day, was always a little behind in the tech available haahahahahaha.
 
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Tracy Perry

Opinionated asshat
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I don't really see how a device being dependent on an outdated browser makes a different browser not fine.
if you need the IE compatibility for any reason, for your use it is not "fine". IE is "fine" because it works. Edge does not work but claims to have IE compatibility (that does not work in this case), therefor for ones use it is not "fine".
 

echo_off

Ponders things of unknowable validity
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if you need the IE compatibility for any reason, for your use it is not "fine". IE is "fine" because it works. Edge does not work but claims to have IE compatibility (that does not work in this case), therefor for ones use it is not "fine".
I would suggest that it is fine for everything else except the use cases that depend on IE, like your security camera software. Just like how newer Windows versions are fine for all use cases except those that depend on legacy Windows features that don't work in compatibility mode.

IE has cost billions across entire industries that had to support it, because it was still available by default on Windows installations, and people who didn't know any better continued to use it, despite better options being available. Conversely it's also costing billions to rebuild software used by enterprises that depend on IE specific features. IE has been kept alive almost entirely by these enterprise systems for a number of years now.

Though it could reasonably be argued that the developers of this legacy software should not have built their web applications to depend on technologies like ActiveX or Flash, but rather stuck to standards-based browser technologies wherever possible. If they had done that, only minimal maintenance would be required to keep the software running on newer browsers. Granted, there weren't always viable standard alternatives for certain requirements if you wanted to stay web-based, and your security camera software is probably just such an example.

I think it's a good thing that MS now encourage Edge and intend to remove IE by default from their operating system. If MS in the future make it unavailable entirely on their operating system, not even an opt-in, you will still be able to use IE with an old Windows version inside of a virtual machine, and boot it up when required.
 

Tracy Perry

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I think it's a good thing that MS now encourage Edge and intend to remove IE by default from their operating system.
Oh, I agree.. but my issue is don't claim IE compatibility if you can't supply it. When you say "IE compatibility" you imply that it will work the same as IE did. In many cases it doesn't. Would it have been better for the provider of that hardware to use HTML5 (which was valid when the hardware was produced)? Yes.. but they didn't. It's similar to some device that were dependent upon SilverLight. One application that we have come across that was dependent upon it does't work with Edge, since Silverlight support has been discontinued. The point is not all business can afford (especially in this economy) to go out and spend $10-$20K on new hardware (that still works) just because someone decides to discontinue support of a long standing ability. For one of the clinics I do IT work for, that amount would be about 1/4 of their yearly profit.
 

Taylor J

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if you need the IE compatibility for any reason, for your use it is not "fine". IE is "fine" because it works. Edge does not work but claims to have IE compatibility (that does not work in this case), therefor for ones use it is not "fine".
I can only ask, did you configure IE mode properly to have it redirect that site/reload that site in IE mode? ActiveX works perfectly fine for me in IE mode.

Configure IE mode Policies | Microsoft Docs
 

Tracy Perry

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I can only ask, did you configure IE mode properly to have it redirect that site/reload that site in IE mode? ActiveX works perfectly fine for me in IE mode.

Configure IE mode Policies | Microsoft Docs
Yes, followed the instructions as provided by MickeySoft. It's something to do with a driver that the company uses in relationship to IE. Just doesn't play well with Edge. Simple solution was to have the business owners and manager use their phone and tablets to monitor using the specific app for the device.
 
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