In Memoriam...

Nev_Dull

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Apr 27, 2010
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This day in 1955 marks the passing of António Egas Moniz, a Portuguese neurologist who was the founder of modern psychosurgery. He was 81.

Moniz had a long career, marked by many notable achievements, including pioneering cerebral angiography using a technique to allow x-ray examination of arteries in the brain in the 1920s, a pre-curser to the modern cat scan. He is most famous, however, for his development of the very first leucotomy procedure to help patients with severe symptoms of psychological illness. It is more commonly known as the prefrontal lobotomy.

Some might call him the patron saint of flat-earthers, anti-vaxers, and religious zealots.
 

Leaf_Green

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Jan 22, 2012
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I owe a lot to people like him. My life has depended on historical and modern research by neurologists. Brain surgery and research are often viewed unfairly because of horror stories regarding mental asylums and lobotomies. Yes, things got pretty bad sometimes, but in recent decades medical science has come so far. Many things had horrible histories but eventually flourished into something great. So many lives are being saved or improved on a daily basis by dedicated neurologists and neurosurgeons.
 

Nev_Dull

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Apr 27, 2010
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That's why I love these little science snippets. We take so much for granted without thinking about where it came from or the people who brought them into reality. So many of our current science owes itself to those individuals who asked questions and searched for answers. We might sometimes shake our heads at those who spent years trying to understand the bodily "humours" or to extract bottled sunshine from cucumbers. Quite often, however, those first strange steps led to real discoveries and expanded our scientific knowledge.
 
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