How To Dual Boot Windows And Linux

Michael

Fan
Joined
May 9, 2004
Messages
741
Michael submitted a new Article:

How To Dual Boot Windows And Linux

Back in early 2007, I was getting tired of all the hassles associated with running Windows. I had been through a really rotten experience with Windows ME on a laptop and it seemed as if there were hundreds of new worms and viruses (virii?) appearing every day. Someone suggested trying Linux, so I did. I installed Ubuntu 7.04 a.k.a. Feisty Fawn via a rather simple method. Lo and behold, Linux worked a treat for me. Over the years, I've tested a pile of Linux distros, installed most of them and have learned a lot about the right ways and wrong ways to install Linux.

Azhria Lilu has always chided me for being a Linux user, but I think she's starting to think about giving it a try. We discussed a tutorial for setting up a dual boot installation of Windows and Linux, so here we go.

Most Linux distros have what is commonly known as a Live CD environment. You can download the .iso file, burn the file to a CD and boot your computer up off the CD, allowing you to test-drive the distro on your machine. If you decide you like that particular distro, you can click an icon and start the installation process.

If you're nervous about using a new operating system, there are some distros I refer to as being Windows-friendly. They have a bit of a Windows feel to them and will allow new Linux users to warm up to Linux easily. I have to admit, I am a big fan of Linux Mint. I use Mint on a couple of systems and this particular system dual boots Linux Mint Debian Edition and PCLinuxOS. I have also found Zorin OS to be very Windows-friendly. With Zorin, you can even set your Zorin Menu up to mimic the Windows XP or Windows 7 menu. Some distros use a desktop environment known as GNOME 2, but you may find you like GNOME 3 or KDE as your desktop environment. And all it will cost you to try them is a bit of time and some CDs.

This tutorial is going to illustrate the installation of Linux Mint 11 alongside Windows 7. And the principles outlined here will work with every distro I've ever seen. If you want to run Fedora, openSUSE or Debian, that's up to you. One of the beauties of running Linux is having the ability to choose whatever you want.

There are going to be some very basic and simplified instructions in this tutorial. I want to direct this toward someone approaching Linux for the first time (well, and convince Azhria Lilu to give it a try), so if you're more technically-minded, just bear with us.

I am going to lay out all the steps in a specific order. If you follow...

Read more about this article here...
 
Last edited by a moderator:

Michael

Fan
Joined
May 9, 2004
Messages
741
Still with me? Good on ye! This process is really very easy, but it scares a lot of potential Linux users away.

OK, now it's time to run Defraggler. Analyze the entire disk and then Defrag the entire disk. This is an important step, so be sure to take the time to do this. If you've been defragging your drive on a regular basis, the procedure won't take long. If you're one of those people who erroneously believe defragging is an unnecessary step, this procedure can easily take 6-8 hours. Windows is extremely inefficient in how it saves data to your hard drive. And it ends up using much more of the drive than is necessary. So you need to defrag the drive, to get all of the Windows data and files compressed into as small an area as possible. Take the time to do this and you will be freeing up more space for your Linux installation.

Once the defragging procedure has finished, it's time to get serious. Follow these instructions, step by step, one at a time and you are about 30 minutes away from enjoying Linux Mint on your computer. Grab a calculator and a scratch pad, so you can do some math and keep some notes.

Open up your Windows Control Panel and type partition into the search box. An administrative link will pop up, to allow you to create and format hard drive partitions. Click that link and the Disk Management tool will open.

db1.png


This particular machine had a 100 GB hard drive. There is a 100 MB partition set aside for system recovery purposes. Your machine may have partitions like this. Dell computers have a DellUtility partition, a RECOVERY partition and an NTFS partition, which is where Windows lives. Do not disturb the utility and recovery partitions! Hover your mouse over the C: drive and right-click...

db2.png


You are going to use the Shrink Volume tool, to reduce the area Windows has to itself, so you can make room for Mint.

db3.png


As you can see here, the tool has determined the volume could be shrunk by half. If your Windows installation is huge, it might not allow you to shrink the volume by that amount. Unless you are familiar with this procedure, accept what the tool is recommending to you and click Shrink.

db4.png


As you can see, the Disk Management tool has shrunk the Windows volume down and has left us about 49 GB of unallocated, free space. That free space is where Mint is going to reside.

Congratulations! You have just performed the scariest part of the entire installation! Everything gets easier from here on out.

OK, now it's time to re-boot your machine. Pop your Linux Mint disc into the drive and tell Windows to Re-Start. Pay close attention as the machine starts back up, because it will give you a menu. You want to press whatever key it offers, to enter the Boot Menu. On nearly every machine I've ever seen, this requires you to press the F12 key. When you get to the Boot Menu, use your cursor keys to highlight the CD/DVD Drive and press Enter. This tells the BIOS to load an operating system from the optical drive, rather than the hard drive.

db5.png


Once you are at the Mint desktop, you will see an icon to Install Mint. Take a deep breath, relax and click away. Here we go, into the Mint installer.

Select your choice of language and verify your system meets the necessary requirements for the installation.

db6.png


Here is your next step. It's time to tell the Installer how you want to install Mint on your hard drive. The first option will set up a dual boot, but not in an optimal manner. All of your Mint operating system files will end up on the same partition as all your Mint data files and if you ever want to update Mint to a newer version, you will lose all your personal data. It works, but not well. You could select that second option, but that will remove Win 7 from the drive, so you want to avoid that one. You want to select Something Else, which allows you to get elbows deep in your hard drive and set up a solid Mint installation. Click Forward.

db7.png


Now you see a graphical representation of your hard drive. Mint sees the system has just one hard drive, identified as /dev/sda. If this machine had a second drive, that drive would be identified as /dev/sdb. And it sees there are two partitions on /dev/sda, the first being dev/sda1, which was that System Recovery partition you saw in the Windows Disk Management tool. /dev/sda2 is the partition where Windows resides. And there is your 50 GB chunk of free, unallocated space. Here, I generally make some notes on the drive architecture, so I can easily see where everything is. Your hard drive may have other partitions, so the numbers might not correspond to this example. This is where notes come in handy.

Highlight the free space section and click Add.

db8.png


You are going to see a Create Partition script, as above. Set up your first partition, just as I have on this one. You are creating a Logical partition, 300 MB in size, at the beginning of the free space, as an Ext4 journaling file system and you are going to mount this partition as /boot. Once you are satisfied everything is set up as above, click OK. The Installer will chew on your choices for a minute and then you will suddenly see /dev/sda5 appear on the graphical menu. Congratulations! You have just created the partition where the Mint bootloader script will reside.

Notice the Create Partition script shows space in megabytes. If you want to convert gigabytes to megabytes, multiply gigabytes by 1024. Inversely, dividing megabytes by 1024 will give you a gigabyte figure.

Click on the free space and click Add.

db9.png


Now it's time to create a swap partition. If you are running a lot of memory-intensive programs at one time in Mint, you can get to a point where you run out of memory in an older machine. If that happens, programs start crashing. And you don't want that, so you set up a swap partition. If memory runs short, Mint will write some of its memory to the swap partition. When memory frees back up, Mint will retrieve the data from swap and write it back to memory. On older machines with limited memory, I like to set up a swap partition that is at least equal to the amount of RAM in the machine. If I have room, I will sometimes double that. This machine had 1 gigabyte of RAM, so I doubled it for my swap partition. Remember the formula - 2 GB X 1024 = 2048 MB. I just went with 2000 MB in this example. Again, it's a Logical partition, 2000 MB in size, located at the beginning of the free space and it is set up to be used as swap area. Click OK. And you will go back to the graphical menu, where you will see /dev/sda6 appear.

Click on the free space and click on Add.

I'll catch up to you in the next post.
 

Michael

Fan
Joined
May 9, 2004
Messages
741
Now, we're getting to where Mint will reside.

db10.png


This is an area where you will want to think things over a bit. You are setting up the root mount point, which is identified as /. This is where the Mint operating system is going to live. You realistically need ~5 GB for root, but this won't allow the installation of a lot of extra programs. But you don't want to waste any drive space that can be used for data storage, either.

I just checked a bare-bones Mint install and it amounts to about 3.5 GB for root. I am currently running a robust install of Linux Mint Debian Edition and that root partition is using 11.98 GB. If you have a huge hard drive, give root as much room as you like. I generally dedicate 20 GB to root, on my personal installations.

On our example machine, I allocated approximately 8 GB for root. I was tempted to bump that up to 10 GB, but I tried to save space for user data. This is another Logical partition, 8000 MB in size, located at the beginning of the free space, set up as an Ext4 journaling system and mounted as /. Click OK. And when you get back to the graphical menu for the drive, you will see /dev/sda7 is there.

Click on the free space and click Add. We're almost finished.

db11.png


I am using the rest of the available free space (41.21 GB) for my /home directory. This is where saved documents, pictures and music files will end up. Another Logical partition, using everything that is left, located at the beginning of the free space, set up as Ext4 journaling system, mounted as /home. Click OK.

db12.png


Now you can see the four Linux partitions I have created - /boot, swap, / and /home. Half the drive is the Windows installation and its recovery partition. The second half is the Mint installation.

OK, now here is an important step. You can overlook the step and I'm betting everything will work just fine. But, we're doing this the safe way, remember? So let's stick to our plan.

db13.png


Under that area identified as the Device for boot loader installation, you will see your hard drive. Click on that menu and you will see another tree menu of your hard drive, as it appears in the upper panel. You are now going to tell Mint where to put the boot loader, known as GRUB2 (GRand Unified Bootloader 2). Since it is a boot loader, I want to install it in the /boot partition. On this example, /boot is at /dev/sda5. So I selected /dev/sda5 as the device where I want the boot loader .

Remember, your partition number might be different from this example. That's why you've been keeping notes, right? Whatever partition number your /boot partition has, that is where you want to install the boot loader.

If you don't specify where you want the boot loader, Mint will add it to the Windows Master Boot Record. Which will work just fine. With a handful of caveats. If you ever need to re-install Windows, it will rewrite the Master Boot Record and there went your GRUB file. Some anti-virus programs will write data to the MBR, which can affect GRUB. For my money, using the Windows MBR is the safest bet. I've used both methods, but I find using the Windows MBR on a system with Windows is the most reliable.

OK, you determined where you want GRUB to end up. And since we've come this far and have nothing left to do, click Install Now.

The Installer will warn you it is going to format your /boot, / and /home partitions. Then it's going to ask you for some configuration information. Tell it what time zone you live in, identify your keyboard layout and then give it your personal information. Enter your name and it will suggest a possible log-in name and a possible computer name. Pay attention to all of these steps. Your log-in name needs to be something you are always going to remember until the end of time. If you forget it, there is no one to e-mail, to ask your details be changed for you. If your computer is on a network in your home, use the same name the network uses to identify that particular machine. I use each computer's model number on my network. This machine is xps410, the big Dell is xps8100, the iMac is imac, etc. Use what you're familiar with. Call your computer Matilda if you want. Password. You better use a password you will never forget. There will be times Mint is going to ask you for your password and it is another piece of information you're not going to be able to e-mail someone to change for you.

Did you read all that? USE A LOG-IN NAME AND PASSWORD YOU WILL ALWAYS REMEMBER! Read that bold print. Read it again. And just to be sure, read it again.

You will then have the option to log into Mint automatically, or to always be prompted for a password. The computers here (with the exception of the laptop) all run 27 hours a day, 9 days a week, 517 days a year. The only time they ever get shut off is if the power goes out. But I do have all my operating systems set up to require a password to log in. If you don't care about the additional layer of security, select automatic log-in. BUT YOU WILL STILL HAVE NEED TO USE YOUR PASSWORD, SO USE A PASSWORD YOU WILL ALWAYS REMEMBER!

Mint will then give you to option to import data from your Windows install. You can import pictures documents, browser data, etc. Be forewarned. 98 year-olds make love faster than the import script runs. If you have an external hard drive, dump your Windows data to it and then pull it into Mint from there. A zip stick works, as well. Importing ~22 GB of data from my Windows install into Mint took longer than the entire rest of the install. B-o-r-i-n-g. But it's there, if you want to use it.

When Mint gets done, you'll see the Mint desktop again, with a dialog box telling you the Live environment is there for you to use, but to complete the installation, you need to quite the Live environment and re-boot.

When the machine starts to log out of Mint, it will pop your optical drive open. Pull the Mint disc out, close the drive and hit Enter. The machine will continue closing Mint and will then re-boot.

But this time, you're going to re-boot into Windows. Don't panic. The Master Boot Record doesn't know Mint is there yet, unless you overlooked that step I pointed out and let the boot loader be installed to the MBR. So your machine will boot directly into Windows, same as it always has.

While you're re-booting, I'm going to move to the next post.
 

Michael

Fan
Joined
May 9, 2004
Messages
741
See, you're already back in your Windows install. Everything is right where you left it.

Now, it's time to click on that EasyBCD icon you downloaded. Win 7 will warn you the program is going to make changes to the system, so agree with that.

db14.png


EasyBCD is showing us the entry in the Windows MBR. There is only one entry and it is the Win 7 install. So now, it's time to add Mint, so you can boot into it.

Click on Add New Entry.

db15.png


At the top, select the Linux/BSD tab. Mint uses GRUB2, so set that as the Type. The name can be anything you want, but I have mine set as the above example. No matter who boots up the machine, I want their options to be crystal-clear, so they will make the right selection. When you selected GRUB2, the Device selection options went away. EasyBCD will be able to find GRUB2 on its own.

Click the Add Entry button. Now, in the left menu, select Edit Boot Menu.

db16.png


You will see I have both entries appearing in the MBR. Select how long you want the MBR to wait, before it loads the default operating system. I like 30 seconds, just in case I get distracted during a re-boot. And note, you can make Mint your default operating system, if you want the machine to default to Mint. With the above settings, I can re-boot the machine and not touch anything. After 30 seconds, it will automagically boot into Windows. Click the Save Settings button.

Are you scared or nervous that you've managed to break your computer into a zillion pieces that all the king's horses and all the king's men won't be able to put together again? If so, that's OK. But, since you followed all my instructions to the letter, you can relax. Because everything is just fine.

Once you have saved the MBR settings, close EasyBCD. Now it's time to re-start your computer. It will log out of Windows and start working its way through the boot procedure and then, all of a sudden, you will see something new and different -

db17.png


The Windows Boot Manager appears, with both Windows and Mint available. Highlight the operating system you want to log into and press Enter.

If you selected to boot into Mint, after a couple seconds, you will see the GRUB menu -

db18.png


As you can see, the Mint installer picked up on the Windows 7 loader being installed on the /dev/sda1 partition. If you selected Mint by mistake in the Windows Boot Manager, you can still select Windows from the GRUB menu and boot into it. Otherwise, you can press Enter or wait for GRUB to time out, after which you will boot into your brandy-new and shiny Mint installation.

And you thought installing Linux was scary? Now you know that just isn't true.

Enjoy Linux Mint!
 

Michael

Fan
Joined
May 9, 2004
Messages
741
The above tutorial seems lengthy, but the steps are actually quite basic and will not take you very long to accomplish.

A lot of people are attracted to Ubuntu Linux, because they have read the name a lot. Ubuntu is OK, but I've found some of the Ubuntu upgrades to be boorish. You might have a sound card that requires a special driver. You download the driver and install it, but 6 months later, you're wanting to update your Ubuntu install to the latest and greatest version. Well, kiss your driver goodbye, and if you're really lucky, you might be able to find a compatible driver in the same place you found the last one.

As I mentioned earlier, Mint has a lot of codecs and drivers pre-installed. So if you update your Mint installation, you'll be getting all those drivers installed again. That alone moves Mint to the front of the pack for me.

Standard Linux Mint is a fork of Ubuntu, so you will have the Ubuntu feel, with all the Minty goodness. And Ubuntu is a fork of Debian, which I consider to be the granddaddy of all Linux distros.

This particular machine has both PCLinuxOS and Linux Mint Debian Edition on it. After you get your feet wet with your new Mint installation, I recommend you take a look at LMDE. LMDE is a direct fork of Debian, which cuts itself away from Ubuntu. Why not just run Debian, you ask? I have and found Debian to be solid as a rock. Debian is like Irn Bru, it's made from girders. I love Debian. But I've found the Mint community forums to be a much more-relaxed place to seek help and advice. The Debian forums are still wild and unconquered and if you venture in there and start asking newbie questions, you'll quickly learn you're not going to be welcomed there. Clem and his team have taken everything that is good about Debian, folded in everything that is good about Mint and cooked up LMDE.

Most Linux distros release updated versions every six months. Debian is an exception to that rule. They release on a 2 year schedule, which means if you are running the latest stable version, everything is tested inside and out and will be completely stable. Unfortunately, it also means you're running some older versions of a lot of software packages. What's the current, stable release of Firefox? 7.0? I'm running nightly builds of Firefox 10a1. Where's Thunderbird, version 7.0.1? I'm running nightly releases of Earlybird 9.0a2. I live out here on the bleeding edge. And always wanting to be using the new stuff, every six months I would be reinstalling Ubuntu or Mint and having to reinstall all of my programs. Which gets tiresome, along about the 5th or 6th time you've done it. Linux Mint Debian Edition is what is known as a rolling distribution. You install it, make sure you're getting updates and your version of LMDE is always going to be the latest and greatest. No more having to install a newly released version over the top of what you already had.

But that is why I walked you through the Mint installation, the way I did. You could have tossed Mint onto that 50 GB chunk of free space and been up and running about 10 minutes faster. But when the next release of Mint rolls out the door, you would have the option of staying with what you had, or overwriting all of your data files with the new install. This way, Mint stays in that root partition and all of your data stays in the home partition. When Mint 12 is released, you can update by simply formatting your root partition, setting up your new install back to root, identifying your swap and home partitions and getting everything finished up in about 10 minutes time.

As I said, there are hundreds and hundreds of Linux distros out there. And most of them will let you choose your desktop environment. I'm partial to GNOME 2, but my PCLinuxOS install runs on KDE. Do you have an older machine with minimal resources? I've run Puppy Linux on a machine with 32 MB of RAM. Mint 11 needs 512 MB of RAM and 5 GB of disk. So don't throw out that old machine, just because Windows runs slow on it. Put Linux on the machine and you'll be amazed to find it running faster than it ever did with Windows. I've seen benchmark tests where people would run Windows as a virtual machine within Linux and see faster responses than running the same tests on a Windows machine.

Here are some links for you -

Linux Mint
PCLinuxOS
Zorin
Ubuntu
Mandriva
Fedora
openSUSE

I've installed and used all of those and (for the best part) have found them all to be user-friendly. Download them and test them yourself, you might find you like one more than another.

Don't worry about your Microsoft Office documents. Linux will provide you with LibreOffice, which easily works with Office file formats. I can use LibreOffice Writer to write a document and then save it in a .doc format, so Office users can use it. You will lose Internet Explorer, but I have Firefox, Opera, Google Chrome, Chromium, Epiphany, Galeon and Midori available. Azhria Lilu lured me onto MSN this morning and it took me a couple minutes to configure Pidgin, so I could come back and use this machine. Photoshop is a lot smarter than I, but so is GIMP. And GIMP has a much nicer price tag - $0.00. Many Windows applications will run under WINE on a Linux machine, but for those that won't, you'll be able to find a Linux application to do the job for you.

And if you can't, remember, you can just boot your machine right back into Windows.
 

Michael Biddle

Senior Member
Joined
Jan 10, 2010
Messages
116
Great tutorial. I will go ahead and vouch for Ubuntu. It is my daily driver at home and work.
 

Biker-AdEx

Kiss my arse!
Joined
May 3, 2010
Messages
630
I just tried OpenSUSE this morning and it was a nightmare. It lasted all of 2 minutes on my machine before being nuked out of existence.

I dual boot as well, but I don't allow the primary hard drive to even enter into the mix.

First thing I did was go into the BIOS and change around the boot order. My notebook looks for USB devices first, then defaults to the internal hard drive.

Then I obtained a nice external USB drive and installed Linux to that drive. So if I fire up the notebook with the USB drive attached, I get a nice pretty Grub screen asking me which Linux distribution I wish to log into. If the USB drive is not plugged in, the machine boots to Windows.

Nice thing about doing it this way is the MBR on the Windows drive isn't touched.
 

FlyingG

Neophyte
Joined
Oct 31, 2012
Messages
1
The above tutorial seems lengthy, but the steps are actually quite basic and will not take you very long to accomplish.

A lot of people are attracted to Ubuntu Linux, because they have read the name a lot. Ubuntu is OK, but I've found some of the Ubuntu upgrades to be boorish. You might have a sound card that requires a special driver. You download the driver and install it, but 6 months later, you're wanting to update your Ubuntu install to the latest and greatest version. Well, kiss your driver goodbye, and if you're really lucky, you might be able to find a compatible driver in the same place you found the last one.

As I mentioned earlier, Mint has a lot of codecs and drivers pre-installed. So if you update your Mint installation, you'll be getting all those drivers installed again. That alone moves Mint to the front of the pack for me.

Standard Linux Mint is a fork of Ubuntu, so you will have the Ubuntu feel, with all the Minty goodness. And Ubuntu is a fork of Debian, which I consider to be the granddaddy of all Linux distros.

This particular machine has both PCLinuxOS and Linux Mint Debian Edition on it. After you get your feet wet with your new Mint installation, I recommend you take a look at LMDE. LMDE is a direct fork of Debian, which cuts itself away from Ubuntu. Why not just run Debian, you ask? I have and found Debian to be solid as a rock. Debian is like Irn Bru, it's made from girders. I love Debian. But I've found the Mint community forums to be a much more-relaxed place to seek help and advice. The Debian forums are still wild and unconquered and if you venture in there and start asking newbie questions, you'll quickly learn you're not going to be welcomed there. Clem and his team have taken everything that is good about Debian, folded in everything that is good about Mint and cooked up LMDE.

Most Linux distros release updated versions every six months. Debian is an exception to that rule. They release on a 2 year schedule, which means if you are running the latest stable version, everything is tested inside and out and will be completely stable. Unfortunately, it also means you're running some older versions of a lot of software packages. What's the current, stable release of Firefox? 7.0? I'm running nightly builds of Firefox 10a1. Where's Thunderbird, version 7.0.1? I'm running nightly releases of Earlybird 9.0a2. I live out here on the bleeding edge. And always wanting to be using the new stuff, every six months I would be reinstalling Ubuntu or Mint and having to reinstall all of my programs. Which gets tiresome, along about the 5th or 6th time you've done it. Linux Mint Debian Edition is what is known as a rolling distribution. You install it, make sure you're getting updates and your version of LMDE is always going to be the latest and greatest. No more having to install a newly released version over the top of what you already had.

But that is why I walked you through the Mint installation, the way I did. You could have tossed Mint onto that 50 GB chunk of free space and been up and running about 10 minutes faster. But when the next release of Mint rolls out the door, you would have the option of staying with what you had, or overwriting all of your data files with the new install. This way, Mint stays in that root partition and all of your data stays in the home partition. When Mint 12 is released, you can update by simply formatting your root partition, setting up your new install back to root, identifying your swap and home partitions and getting everything finished up in about 10 minutes time.

As I said, there are hundreds and hundreds of Linux distros out there. And most of them will let you choose your desktop environment. I'm partial to GNOME 2, but my PCLinuxOS install runs on KDE. Do you have an older machine with minimal resources? I've run Puppy Linux on a machine with 32 MB of RAM. Mint 11 needs 512 MB of RAM and 5 GB of disk. So don't throw out that old machine, just because Windows runs slow on it. Put Linux on the machine and you'll be amazed to find it running faster than it ever did with Windows. I've seen benchmark tests where people would run Windows as a virtual machine within Linux and see faster responses than running the same tests on a Windows machine.

Here are some links for you -

Linux Mint
PCLinuxOS
Zorin
Ubuntu
Mandriva
Fedora
openSUSE

I've installed and used all of those and (for the best part) have found them all to be user-friendly. Download them and test them yourself, you might find you like one more than another.

Don't worry about your Microsoft Office documents. Linux will provide you with LibreOffice, which easily works with Office file formats. I can use LibreOffice Writer to write a document and then save it in a .doc format, so Office users can use it. You will lose Internet Explorer, but I have Firefox, Opera, Google Chrome, Chromium, Epiphany, Galeon and Midori available. Azhria Lilu lured me onto MSN this morning and it took me a couple minutes to configure Pidgin, so I could come back and use this machine. Photoshop is a lot smarter than I, but so is GIMP. And GIMP has a much nicer price tag - $0.00. Many Windows applications will run under WINE on a Linux machine, but for those that won't, you'll be able to find a Linux application to do the job for you.

And if you can't, remember, you can just boot your machine right back into Windows.

Mike: I am a dummy in Linux, even though I have used Ubuntu for several years. However I had an old Toshiba M65 laptop with XP on it, so I used your tutorial above to install Mint 13. Everything went fine till I came to the part about using EasyBCD to modify the XP boot record. Apparently EasyBCD doesn't work with XP, so now I don't know how to modify the MBR to create the dual boot. So far I have not been able to find an easy program equivalent to EasyBCD. Do you have any suggestions, or a tutorial (even better) which would help me out. The tutorial you created above was very well written.
 

Biker-AdEx

Kiss my arse!
Joined
May 3, 2010
Messages
630
I never did have much luck with easyBCD. I would suggest letting the distro handle the dual boot via Grub or whatever boot manager your distro uses.
 
Top